Naah

Maggie woke up to see the lizard sitting comfortably over the now stationary fan. She hated lizards; this one particularly so because it was huge, scaly, and somehow reaffirmed the alien status of the place she lived in. It had a body like baby croc, she thought, and big beady eyes staring at her with lizardly lust. Sweating more than she had in her entire life, Maggie got up to draw the curtains back, but one glance outside made her change her mind. The electricity kicked back in, the table fan whirred back to life, and the bastard lizard lazily moved down to the table, one eye still leching. She had tried telling the manager (Ha! Manager! Seedy-motherfucker-who-ran-this-joint, more like), but it just hid itself every time the slimy bastard came to the room. He was more interested in the underwear anyway, the fucker. Last night she had closed the hole in the wall with her bag, but it found a way out from somewhere else. Today morning she actually hit it with her shoes, but it got up again and licked her bag. She was never going to touch the bag again.
The phone rang again. She finally got up and put on a tee shirt. She knew the little hole in front of the phone was where the Ukrainian lesbian prostitute dancer from next door was standing, trying to get a peek. As she picked it up, the lizard moved away from the table, almost as if it knew who it was on the line.
“Uhrr… Hello?”
Maggie hated her own voice in the mornings.
There was no mistaking the smoked out voice from the other end.
Firangi bhenchod, it’s time.”
She hated it when he called her Firangi.

6 thoughts on “Naah

  1. This is crazy shit – brilliant crazy shit. I love the way it has been written: the detailing of things of little importance yet significant, and the length in which the story completes itself but yet leaves *so* much to the reader’s imagination. If this were LJ, this post would have gone to my memories. In your words, “awesome sauce.”

  2. Post a few re-reads and keeping the macro picture in mind, I have an observation. You may want to re-look at this:

    1. She had tried telling the manager…: has both the manager and the liz as subjects.
    2. He was more interested…: has the manager as subject.
    3. Last night she had closed..: confuses the reader for a split of a second becuase you have been talking about the liz as well as the manager coming into the room in the last two sentences.

    Excuse me for wearing my reviewer hat.

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